What you can’t explain in 3 minutes

Over the past two years, scientists have proved that you can do a lot in 3 minutes. Dozens of ocean scientists submitting to Ocean 180 have successfully explained the results, meaning, and significance of a recent publication in their entries, fitting it all into a beautiful and concise 180-second long video abstract. The time limit is, without a doubt, a…

352 Pins…and Counting

Is your pin on the map yet? There are currently 352 small pins dotting our map of the world. Each marks one school which is now part of the 2015 Ocean 180 Student Judging Team and while it looks crowded, there’s still room for more! With pins located in all 50 US states, DC, the US Virgin…

Comments from the Classroom

Ten weeks ago, Ocean 180 opened classroom registration for teachers around the world and the response has been nothing short of incredible. Since July, 227 teachers have added nearly 1,000 classrooms and more than 22,000 middle school students to our judging team. These students will be responsible for viewing and evaluating the top 10 video abstracts, searching…

Updated Judging Rubrics

We’re just one month away from opening submissions for the 2015 Ocean 180 Video Challenge! As the submission period for scientists inches closer and closer, we hope you’re already hard at work scheming up your entry for this year. For those who might be starting an Ocean 180 submission (or even just considering it), it’s helpful…

What Makes a Winning Video Abstract?

Fitting your research into 3 minutes is not an easy job. In fact, most scientists who created video abstracts last year remarked it was the most difficult part of the challenge. There are a multitude of stories from your research, great moments and experiences that led to your results. Unfortunately, 180 seconds isn’t always enough…